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      Roses of Picardy: a research in progress

 

 

 

Haydn Wood and films

 

 

Three Famous Cinema Stars (1928)

 

Haydn Wood was interested in theatre and opera, for both personal and professional reasons. But he didn't neglect film either, if one takes into account Three Famous Cinema Stars, a suite for orchestra (or for piano) which he composed in the autumn of 1928. Each movement characterizes a film personality: Ivor Novello, Dolores Del Rio and Charlie Chaplin.

 

In linking his "Valse Apache" to Ivor Novello's name, Haydn Wood was evoking The Rat, a 1926 British film directed by Graham Cutts with Novello as a boss of the Parisian underworld. Ivor Novello (1893-1951) was a popular British composer of songs and a successful actor in theater and films. He became a star in 1927 in the title role of Alfred Hitchcock's film, The Lodger—his character was mistakenly identified as a serial killer and saved from being lynched at the last minute.

Ivor Novello in The Rat.

 

Dolores Del Rio (1905-1983) was a Mexican actress who made her Hollywood debut in 1925 and rose rapidly to stardom. Seven of her films were released in Great Britain in 1928; moreover, she paid a promotional visit to London in August of that year.

 

Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977), whom Haydn Wood had perhaps seen live in vaudeville in England, had become an international film star in 1914. Chaplin's film The Circus was released in London in March 1928.

 


 

The Small Man (1935)

 

Directed by John Baxter, made in February 1935 at Stoll Studios, Cricklewood, London, and released on 9 September 1935.

It tells the story of shopkeepers in an English provincial town who are being squeezed out by the multiple store. Haydn Wood composed the music for this film which is now lost. A reviewer in the Kinematograph Weekly wrote that "the music by Haydn Wood is very appropriate and tuneful".

The same reviewer found fault with the addition of a sequence of musical numbers, which he thought did not fit into the story line. In one of these numbers Haydn Wood was seen conducting the Fodens Band with the baritone Thorpe Bates singing Wake up, You Son of a Gun! that Wood had composed for the film.

 

Production still: Haydn Wood (center), Thorpe Bates (left) and the Fodens Band.

 


 

Riders to the Sea (1935)





 

This medium-length British film directed by Brian Desmond Hurst, was shot in 1935 and released in 1937. It tells the story of one woman on the west coast of Ireland who has lost her husband, and all her sons—one by one, each drowned at sea.

Haydn Wood orchestrated the film score by arranging five traditional Irish airs (the first one is known as My Lagan Love). His friend and colleague Joseph Lewis conducted the orchestra.

This film can be watched on YouTube.

 


 

Pathé News (1946)

 

In the spring of 1946, Pathé News filmed Haydn Wood in Queen Mary's Garden, Regent's Park, London. The newsreel was released on 3 June 1946 with a commentary spoken over Bird of Love Divine, Intermezzo, for full orchestra, which Wood had based on his hit song Bird of Love Divine. The interpretation heard in the newsreel had been recently recorded by the New Concert Orchestra conducted by Jay Wilbur for the Boosey & Hawkes mood music library.

At the very end of the reel, a symphony orchestra and its conductor are seen playing what the audience would think to be Bird of Love Divine, but it was actually some available footage of Sir Edward Elgar conducting one of his own compositions.

More on this newsreel here on this page.

 

The newsreel can be watched on the British Pathé channel on YouTube.

 


 

Exclusive!

Haydn Wood's compositions in films

Films in which Haydn Wood's music is performed or listened to by the characters,
or is used as background music.

With Woody Allen, Alfred Hitchcock, David Lean, and Steven Spielberg.

 




Musical works are in alphabetical order.
Musical work date is the date of publication.
Film date is the production date, not the release date.
Non English-language films are listed under their English title, with the original language title following in brackets. Where a film has never been released with an English title, it is listed under its original title with an English translation following in square brackets.

A chronoligical discrepancy related to a work by Haydn Wood in a film is mentioned as a curiosity. Such a mention is not judgmental.

Links to video-sharing websites: the film you expect to watch may have been blocked in your country.

 


Bird of Love Divine (1912)

in This Happy Breed
directed by David Lean (UK, 1944)

London, 1925: the Gibbons are celebrating Christmas. Frank and Ethel spend a moment together in the dimly lit kitchen while their children and friends get together in the living room with aunt Sylvia. The latter insists on singing a couple of songs and accompanying herself at the piano. She sings—badly—Bird of Love Divine, which Frank and Ethel can hear through the partition.

One can see an authentic copy of the sheet music of Bird of Love Divine on the piano rack.

 


Bird of Love Divine

in Waterloo Road
directed by Sidney Gilliat (UK, 1944)

During the London Blitz and while her husband is mobilized, Tillie becomes infatuated with Ted, a tough guy.

Instead of taking her to a shelter when an alert sounds, he takes her to his place and seduces her. The radio suddenly announces: 'Bird of Love Divine by Haydn Wood.' Upon hearing the charming melody, Tillie runs a gamut of emotions; first laughing nervously, then gathering herself together, then shedding tears over her husband. Ted complains about the money he has spent to please her. She answers back that she can't believe how cheap he can be—and he slaps her.

This recording by a full orchestra of Bird of Love Divine was probably recorded especially for this film.

 


Bird of Love Divine, Intermezzo (1932)

in Haydn Wood
Path
é News (UK, 1946)
newsreel

In this short documentary, Haydn Wood is seen taking a walk in a garden, looking down on water lilies from a bow bridge, resting on a bench in front of a rose bed, and staring up at trees.

'He gets the right mood for composition, just where you would expect: in a garden.' The commentary is spoken over Bird of Love Divine, Intermezzo for full orchestra.

The recording by the New Concert Orchestra conducted by Jay Wilbur is from the Boosey & Hawkes mood music library (UK, 1946?).

The newsreel can be watched on the British Pathé channel on YouTube.

More on this newsreel here on this page.

 


A Brown Bird Singing (1922)

in The Duchess of Duke Street: Poor Little Rich Girl
directed by Cyril Coke (UK, 1977)

television series: season 2, episode 15

London in the mid-1920s: Louisa Trotter is the owner of a small upper-class hotel on Duke Street. Her daughter Lottie longs for a career as a singer, despite her mother's objections.

From the entrance hall, some of Louisa's staff stops to listen to Lottie singing upstairs at her first singing lesson. Her voice teacher accompanies her at the piano in A Brown Bird Singing.

One can see the sheet music of A Brown Bird Singing on the piano rack.

Both actress and actor (Lalla Ward and Jeremy Nicholas) actually performed A Brown Bird Singing in the course of the sequence shooting.

 


A Brown Bird Singing

in Le Shah d'Iran, un homme à abattre [The Shah of Iran, a Marked Man]
directed by Reynold Ismard (France, 2004)

television documentary

Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the shah of Iran, married three times. This documentary about his domestic and international politics also tells the circumstances of his marriages to Fawzia of Egypt, to Soraya Esfandiary, and eventually to Farah Diba.

A Brown Bird Singing is the background music for each of these three stories.

The recording by Eric Jupp and the Melodi Strings is from the Chappell recorded music library (UK, 1959?).

 


A Brown Bird Singing

in Secrets of the Lough - Part 1
directed by Michael Beatie (UK, 2004)

television documentary

A sequence in this documentary evokes the history of Whitehead, Northern Ireland, one of the "secrets" of the Belfast Lough.

A Brown Bird Singing is the background music for a part of the sequence.

The recording by Eric Jupp and the Melodi Strings is from the Chappell recorded music library (UK, 1959?).

This documentary can be watched on YouTube.

 


A Brown Bird Singing

in Coronation Street
directed by John Anderson (UK, 2005)

television series, episode 6022

Sally and Kevin really enjoyed having a day out to Blackpool with their girls. But 'it's just a shame we've got work tomorrow.'

The radio is playing A Brown Bird Singing.

The recording of A Brown Bird Singing by Eric Jupp and the Melodi Strings is from the Chappell recorded music library (UK, 1959?).

 


A Brown Bird Singing

in Wellington Bomber
directed by Peter Williams (UK, 2010)

television documentary

One weekend in the early 1940s, at an aircraft factory in Broughton, Wales, a group of men and women managed to build a Wellington Bomber in 23 hours and 50 minutes. Hilda was one of them.

She met Percy Dodd at a dance, he got caught up to go in the Navy, they married in a rush, and she never saw him again for three and a half years. A Brown Bird Singing accompanies their story.

The recording of A Brown Bird Singing by Eric Jupp and the Melodi Strings is from the Chappell recorded music library (UK, 1959?).

This documentary can be watched on YouTube.

 


The Harvesters' Dance (1921)
from Harvest Time, Suite

in Ian Hislop's Stiff Upper Lip, An Emotional History of Britain - Part 3
directed by Tom McCarthy (UK, 2012)

television documentary

How the British have expressed their feelings throughout the 20th century.

Ian Hislop drives to the British Cartoon Archive at Canterbury. An excerpt from The Harvesters' Dance accompanies the drive to the Archive and finishes while he comments on the cartoon Adaptability to Foreign Conditions by Pont (Graham Laidler).

The recording of The Harvesters' Dance is from the Boosey & Hawkes recorded music library with William Hodgson conducting the Regent Concert Orchestra (UK, 1939?).

 


The Horse Guards, Whitehall: March (1946)
from London Landmarks, Suite

in Agatha Christie's Poirot: The Million Dollar Bond Robbery
directed by Andrew Grieve (UK, 1990)
television series: season 3, episode 3

A London bank manager is responsible for taking one million dollars in Liberty Bonds to the bank's branch in America. Poirot is hired to keep an eye out for any trouble regarding the bonds, so he and his friend Hastings are able to ride the maiden voyage of the Queen Mary.

Another case for Poirot. And there are over two thousand cases which are being loaded safely on board.

The boarding and the departure are told through a reconstructed newsreel which includes original footage from British Movietone News. The Horse Guards, Whitehall is the background music for the reconstructed newsreel.

The maiden voyage of the Queen Mary took place in 1936 while The Horse Guards, Whitehall is dated 1946.

The recording is from the Chappell recorded music library (London, orchestra and date both unknown).

The episode can be watched on dailymotion.

 


The Horse Guards, Whitehall: March

in The Extraordinary
(Australia, 1993)
television series, programme 18

The last part of this weekly television programme (definite date unknown) looks back on the 1946 Australian Epsom at Randwick, Sydney. Left fifteen lengths behind at the start because of the starter's mistake, Shannon, ridden by Darby Munro, made a sensational finish in second place half a head behind the winner.

Entirely illustrated with archive footage, this part of the programme is first accompanied by The Horse Guards, Whitehall.

The recording is from the Chappell recorded music library (London, orchestra and date both unknown).

This programme can be watched on YouTube.

 


The Horse Guards, Whitehall: March

in Fifties British War Films: Days of Glory
directed by Hans Petch (UK, 2012)
television documentary

In the 1950s, Britain looked back on its epic WW2 effort in films such as The Dam Busters, The Cruel Sea, and The Colditz Story. However, even at the time these productions were criticised for being class-bound and living in the past.

The journalist and historian Simon Heffer argues that these films have real cinematic merit and a genuine cultural importance, that they tell us something significant not only about the 1950s Britain from which they emerged, but also about what it means to be British today.

After Heffer's introduction, the documentary starts with a series of short excerpts quickly paced to the accompaniment of The Horse Guards, Whitehall.

Another series of short excerpts including film posters terminates the documentary, again to the accompaniment of The Horse Guards, Whitehall. And Heffer's final words are followed by the final bars of the music.

The recording is from the Chappell recorded music library (London, orchestra and date both unknown).

 


I Look Into Your Garden (1924)

in Charles Hackett, Leading Tenor of the Chicago Civic Opera Co.
Vitaphone (USA, 1929)

The American tenor Charles Hackett recorded this ballad by Haydn Wood on Vitaphone, the new sound film system with which Warner Bros. put an end to the silent movies era. Such films were shown in cinemas as a supplement to the main programme.

After he had sung I Look Into Your Garden, Charles Hackett carried on with another ballad, I Heard You Singing, composed by Eric Coates. The pianist's name is not known.


 


A May-day, Overture (1919)

in Men, Women, and Clothes - Part 6: Facing the Elements
devised and written by Doris Langley Moore (UK, 1957)

television documentary

This documentary reveals what it took to be stylish through over 250 years of British fashion history.

The Victorians paid homage to summer, with men allowed to appear at a picnic in their shirt-sleeves. But girls were still overdressed with layers of underclothing, tight waists, and crinolines.

Although the term Grecian sandals was applied to certain shoes, they were nothing like the light cool shoes of the mid-20th century.

Part of the introduction of A May-day, Overture is the background music for this sequence.

The recording is from the Boosey & Hawkes recorded music library with Cédric Dumont conducting the New Concert Orchestra (UK, 1946?).

This documentary can be watched on YouTube.

 


Roses of Picardy (1916)

in Roses of Picardy
directed by Maurice Elvey (UK, 1927)

in Camera Interviews: Mr F. E. Weatherly, KC, the Famous Song Writer
Pathé Pictorial (UK, 1928)

in Strong and Willing
Vitaphone (USA, 1930)

in Rudy Starita and His New 'Octarimba' in Melodies of Long Ago
Pathé Pictorial (UK, 1936)

in Forever and a Day
directed by Edmund Goulding, and others (USA, 1942)

in Variety Jubilee
directed by Maclean Rogers (UK, 1943)

in This Happy Breed
directed by David Lean (UK, 1944)

in I Live in Grosvenor Square (aka A Yank in London)
directed by Herbert Wilcox (UK, 1945)

in Devil in the Flesh (Le Diable au corps)
directed by Claude Autant-Lara (France, 1946)

in The Courtneys of Curzon Street (aka Kathy's Love Affair)
directed by Herbert Wilcox (UK, 1947)

in It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown
directed by Bill Melendez (USA, 1966)

in Oh! What a Lovely War
directed by Richard Attenborough (UK, 1968)

in Those Daring Young Men in Their Jaunty Jalopies (aka Monte Carlo or Bust!)
directed by Ken Annakin (Italy, France, UK, 1968)

in Solveigin laulu [Solveig's Song]
directed by Reima Kekäläinen (Finland, 1973)

in Upstairs Downstairs: Peace out of Pain
directed by Christopher Hodson (UK, 1974)

in Aces High
directed by Jack Gold (UK, 1975)

in MASH: Old Soldiers
directed by Charles S. Dubin (USA, 1979)

in One Deadly Summer (L'Été meurtrier)
directed by Jean Becker (France, 1982)

in The Indomitable Teddy Roosevelt
directed by Harrison Engle (USA, 1983)

in A Passage to India
directed by David Lean (UK, 1984)

in He Died with His Eyes Open (On ne meurt que deux fois)
directed by Jacques Deray (France, 1985)

in A Month in the Country
directed by Pat O'Connor (UK, 1986)

in The Whales of August
directed by Lindsay Anderson (USA, 1986)

in Cause célèbre
directed by John Gorrie (UK, 1987)

in Another Woman
directed by Woody Allen (USA, 1988)

in The House of Eliott
directed by Graeme Harper (UK, 1992)

in Performance: Message for Posterity
directed by David Jones (UK, 1994)

in Johnny and the Dead
directed by Gerald Fox (UK, 1994)

in Black Holes (I buchi neri)
directed by Pappi Corsicato (Italy, 1995)

in Léargas: Ná Ling Sinn i eDearmad ... [Léargas: Lest We Be Forgotten ...]
directed by Pat Butler (Ireland, 2003)

in Ladies in Lavender
directed by Charles Dance (UK, 2003)

in Downton Abbey
directed by James Strong (UK, 2011)

in War Horse
directed by Steven Spielberg (USA, 2011)

in Birdsong
directed by Philip Martin (UK, 2011)

in Les Fils du vent [Sons of the Wind]
directed by Bruno Le Jean (France)

in Before the Winter Chill (Avant l'hiver)
directed by Philippe Claudel (France, Luxembourg, 2012)

in An Accidental Soldier
directed by Rachel Ward (Australia, 2013)

in The Danish Girl
directed by Tom Hooper (UK, 2015)

in Cézanne et moi (Cézanne et moi)
directed by Danièle Thompson (France, 2015)

 


Slave Dance (1929)
from Egypta, An Egyptian Suite

in Rich and Strange (aka East of Shanghai)
directed by Alfred Hitchcock (UK, 1931)

A young English couple, Fred and Emily Hill, receive a big inheritance and decide to realize all their dreams. They leave for a cruise to the Far East behaving as rich people. Paris is the first stop and the Folies Bergère are not to be missed. In the sheer and low cut gown that she wears for the first time, Emily feels as naked as the chorus girls on stage actually are.

However, a prudish Hitchcock delivers a chaste and abridged reconstruction of a Folies Bergère show. One of the numbers is danced to a few bars of Slave Dance, by exotic female warriors armed with lances and shields.

This film might well be the only way to listen to what is a quite short excerpt from Egypta, because no recording of it is known to have been made.

 


Vienna, 1913 (1936)
from Frescoes, Suite

in Oh, Boy!
directed by Albert de Courville (UK, 1937)

June Messanger is a model in a London department store. Her boss is one of her lovers.

She is the principal in a fashion show which her other lover also attends.

Vienna, 1913 is a waltz, an excerpt of which accompanies the show and the rivals' unfriendly encounter.

 


Virginia, A Southern Rhapsody (1927)

in Mästarnas Match [Championship Fight] (aka Ingo vs. Floyd)
directed by Per Gunvall (Sweden, 1959)

documentary

Ingemar Johansson (Sweden) versus Floyd Patterson (USA): the World Heavyweight Boxing Championship took place in New York City on 25 June 1959.

Over the last few days before the match, Per Gunvall filmed each of the two opponents and their entourage. An excerpt from Virginia is the background music for the sequence about Patterson. Sometimes pastoral—Patterson was training in a rural area—sometimes 'athletic', the music excerpt is repeated as a loop a couple of times.

The recording is from the Chappell recorded music library with Charles Williams conducting the Queen's Hall Light Orchestra (London, 1942).

 


When the Daisy Opes Her Eyes, Valse (1911)

in Metro-land
written by John Betjeman and produced by Edward Mirzoeff (UK, 1972)

television documentary

John Betjeman's meditation on the London suburbs served by the Metropolitan Line takes him to the Chilton Court restaurant which was built above Baker Street station circa 1913. Customers, before they took the train for home, could listen to a band playing for the thé dansant. Betjeman seems to hear the band playing When the Daisy Opes Her Eyes.

The music continues with 1910 footage of Baker Street station followed by a shot of the disused Malborough Road station.

When the Daisy Opes Her Eyes is played by Albert Sandler and his orchestra (London, 1 February 1940).

 


Who Cares? (1929)
from Dear Love

in These Foolish Things
directed by Julia Taylor-Stanley (UK, 2005)

London in 1938: Diana is a young actress who seeks to follow in her famous mother's footsteps. She meets Robin, a struggling playwright. Who Cares? accompanies an uninterrupted series of short scenes:

Douglas, an actor of some success, tries a new tailor-made suit; he is joined by a friend who is an entertainment columnist.

Robin introduces Diana to his landlady, a retired showgirl who is delighted to have Diana as a new tenant.

Diana smiles to the landlady and to Robin.

Robin at his typewriter.

Diana and Dolly have fun in a park—they had met at a drama school.

Robin on his bed counts what is left of his bank notes.

Diana looks for a bread and butter job in the small ads.

Diana and Dolly line up in a theatre agent's waiting room.

Who Cares? is played by Jack Hylton and his orchestra, with Sam Browne singing the chorus (London, 8 November 1929).

 


(to be continued)

Roses of Picardy in films

 


Home A short biography Available sheet music Roses of Picardy: the real story
About us Days in the life of Haydn Wood The recorded works The lyrics of Roses of Picardy
Contact us Haydn Wood and Slaithwaite Live performances Roses of Picardy printed music
  Haydn Wood and the Isle of Man   The performers of Roses of Picardy
The Haydn Wood Music Shop Haydn Wood, symphonist   A discography of Roses of Picardy
Our CD A Breezy Ballad Haydn Wood and films   Les enregistrements de Roses de Picardie
Our lectures Haydn Wood 2009   Roses of Picardy in films
      Roses of Picardy: a research in progress

This page last modified 13 December 2016.

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